gotitforheaps:

Future Islands on Letterman [x]

Still can’t stop watching this video, weeks later.

defendneworleans:

Lee Circle, 1928.

sfmoma:

tatecollectives:

Thanks for the submitting - See you on Friday for our 1840s GIF Party! 

This… this is amazing.

sfmoma:

tatecollectives:

Thanks for the submittingSee you on Friday for our 1840s GIF Party

This… this is amazing.

todaysdocument:

NEW YORK, NY - Sky-line for the masque ball! - Beaux Arts fete features novel architectural costumes.

Excerpted from: This Week in Universal News: Beaux-Arts Ball, 1931, Universal News Volume 3, Release 7 #1-10, January 19, 1931

On January 23, 1931, architects dressed up as the buildings they designed for the Beaux-Arts Ball in New York.  In this week’s featured story, they are pictured  from left to right, A. Stewart Walker as the Fuller Building, Leonard Schultze as the Waldorf-Astoria, Ely Jacques Kahn as the Squibb Building, William Van Alen as the Chrysler Building, Ralph Walker as the Wall Street Building and Joseph Freedlander as the Museum of the City of New York.

Watch the entire newsreel, featuring a polar submarine, a train wreck, Charles Lindbergh receiving a medal from a French ambassador, dancing dogs, and “dangerous” figure skating, among other stories here.

Universal Newsreels were shown in movie theaters twice a week, from 1929 until 1967, and covered a wide range of American life and history during that time period. In 1974, Universal deeded its collection to the United States through the National Archives and is one of our most used motion picture collections. Learn more about the Universal Newsreel Collection in this post and in this Prologue article. Watch other Universal Newsreels in our research room, in OPA, and on this playlist.

via Media Matters » This Week in Universal News: Beaux-Arts Ball, 1931

specialbored:

Buzz Feed yo’ face….

I love Vinnie’s so very much.

specialbored:

Buzz Feed yo’ face….

I love Vinnie’s so very much.

The sum of all positive integers

jkottke:

What do you think you get if you add 1+2+3+4+5+… all the way on up to infinity? Probably a massively huge number, right? Nope. You get a small negative number:

This is, by a wide margin, the most noodle-bending counterintuitive thing I have ever seen. Mathematician Leonard Euler actually proved this result in 1735, but the result was only made rigorous later and now physicists have been seeing this result actually show up in nature. Amazing. (thx, chris)

My first gif. I’m so proud.

My first gif. I’m so proud.